A Legitimate TED-Talk.

Disclaimer: I wrote this a couple of months ago before I had even been offered the opportunity to deliver a TEDx talk, & it was scheduled for release at the time of writing. Therefore the timing of the post is purely coincidental!

Anyone under the age of 35 has probably been lectured about how technology is sucking out our souls through our eye sockets and we’re only one grammatical error away from Skynet doing its thing. Some of us will even have received the lecture via social media, the irony of the matter being lost entirely on the person posting their expressive art about technology’s role in the destruction of humanity online. Technology gives us cancer, and big corporations use it to brainwash us into buying their products, and we’re losing the ability to socialise properly, and it’s making us paranoid etc.

Technology is not all bad. How many lives have been saved because instead of having to find the nearest phone box, someone could call an ambulance at the scene? How much more data can scientific studies collect and analyse for even better results? How many people have received earlier diagnoses of progressive diseases that would have just killed them before? How much progress would have been made in the fight against ableism if disabled people didn’t have technology to help them voice their concerns?

Chances are that even the most disabled among us can still use technology. New apps and programs become available all the time that read out loud to the visually impaired, or translate between English and sign language for the deaf, or give someone who is unable to speak a voice. Social media has allowed people with the same disabilities from across the globe to connect to each other, so even the most isolated patients can find others like them and support each other.

Cameras are very useful for providing physical evidence of discrimination such as blocked access routes, and also the abuse we can receive when asking people not to block access. Once posted online the rest of the world can finally see for themselves the difficulties disabled people face in their day-to-day lives. Sometimes it can even result in legal action.

Perhaps most significantly of all it can be extremely difficult to organise a demonstration against ableism due to poor access to transport, and the fact that all of the affordable hotels in the area will only have one accessible room apiece, which will be quickly booked up. Technology has instead allowed us to break the taboo around disability and discuss it properly, highlighting and resolving issues, and raising awareness of the fact that we are also humans.

Nor can disabled people easily sue for discrimination due to the difficulties in finding employment due to access and transport issues, and also because many courts lack wheelchair access, even going so far as a have steps up to the witness box. Technology has allowed us to shame ableist actions to the point where public outcry has forced government leaders to tackle the issue.

Technology does have its drawbacks, but the truth of the matter is that technology has helped to improve more lives than it’s ruined. There was a point in history when reading and writing was considered unnecessary technology, but now those abilities are almost sacred to us. How much of technophobia is actually due to a genuine fear of technology, and how much of it is simply a fear of change?

 

Coming Soon to DOADP.

Plenty of extra’s are coming to Diary of a Disabled Person, starting this Thursday when I will be releasing the script for my TEDx Talk on Disability in Education & Employment.

If you don’t already make sure you click that subscribe button, or follow me on social media (Facebook & Instagram: @diaryofadisabledperson, Twitter: @WheelsofSteer), and you won’t miss a thing!

Image description: A dark red graffiti splat on a brick wall, with white text over the top reading "14/03/2019: TEDx Talk - Disability in Education & Employment. Coming Soon: The Rejects - articles born from my rejected Cracked pitches AND Short Stories - Season 3."

Don’t Miss Me Too Much!

Just a quick reminder that I won’t be posting tomorrow due to the small matter that is my honeymoon. However, if you don’t already, you’re definitely going to want to follow me on Instagram (@diaryofadisabledperson) because my feed will be straight fire all week!

Diary of a Disabled Person: LIVE!

I have been asked to give a Ted-talk at the Disability Labour Association on Thursday 14th March, at Leeds Civic Hall.

So, if you want to hear the dulcet Yorkshire tones behind the blog with your own ears, be there from 6.45 – 8.00 pm.

If you’re really nice, I might even take a selfie with you (cake bribes optional).

Image description: Facebook event for the talk reading "DLA: Disability Labour Association. 14th March 2019, 18:45 - 20:30, West Room, Leeds Civic Hall."

Honeymoon.

Next week I’ll be heading to London for my honeymoon, so for the first time in Diary of a Disabled Person history, I’ll be taking a week off from blogging.

Diary of a Disabled Person will return on Sunday 10th March with brand new content!

In the meantime, you can keep up with everything I get up to on Facebook & Instagram (@diaryofadisabledperson), & Twitter (@WheelsofSteer).

Don’t miss me too much!

Nomination: The Flawesome Award.

I’m incredibly proud to announce that Diary of a Disabled Person has been nominated for a sixth award; the Flawesome Award!

I hope to accept the award on Sunday, provided I have time to write the acceptance post by then.

Until then, many thanks to The Invisible Vision Project for their kind nomination.

Image description: Award Number 6: The Flawesome Award! With many thanks to the Invisible Vision Project for their kind nomination written in blue text in a white box, with a blue shimmering border.