The Many Theories of M.E.

Despite the recent surge of developments in medical research surrounding the condition, the internet is rife with a myriad of pseudo-scientific theories from non-medical experts describing what causes the condition, how it can be prevented, and how it can be cured. These theories are often demeaning to sufferers of M.E (a.k.a. CFS) claiming that we simply don’t look after our bodies, or that it is nothing but a cry for attention. They also tend to support the claim that M.E is not a real disease, reinforcing the negative stigma surrounding what I can assure you is a very real illness.

There is, however, one redeeming feature of these theories; they can be down-right hilarious.

One I hear a lot from people who know that I have a first class honours degree in nutrition is that my illness is the result of multiple nutrient deficiencies, and could be cured by using over-the-counter nutrient supplements. Considering my knowledge of the subject, my ability to tailor my diet to my needs, and to recognise the symptoms of nutrient deficiencies in myself and others, this theory denies all logic. Similarly, if I needed nutrient supplements, the doctor would prescribe them. The only noticeable effects of the store-bought nutrient supplements in the absence of a deficiency is the excess nutrients excreted (meaning the expense quite literally gets flushed down the toilet), and sometimes the onset of nutrient-overdose. Which can have quite serious and permanent effects, such as death.

This is far from the only ridiculous theory I hear. One commonly encountered by M.E sufferers across the world is the idea that we simply need to exercise more. Our “laziness” has led to us being so unfit that this becomes symptomatic. This of course does not apply to all the other unfit people on the planet who suffer no symptoms at all when resting, or walking to the bathroom. I have been told time and time again that my symptoms result from muscle wastage, despite the fact that while I do have much weaker muscle tone than average, you can still see some muscle definition across my whole body. I am told to push through the “pain barrier”, but I can assure you that the pain barrier does not exist for M.E sufferers, and the pain simply gets worse the longer you remain active for.

I have also been told to get pregnant. The logic behind this one is as follows; after undergoing nine months of growing a miniature parasite inside your body, which takes a great deal of energy, and then squeezing the thing out like trying skinny jeans on while being in denial about your clothes size (we’ve all been there), the maternal instinct of holding the baby would override the tiredness signals from my brain. Now I don’t know about you but my personal encounters with new parents show a distinct trend of utter exhaustion from the lack of sleep and constant nappy changing, plus the energy requirements for mothers who choose to breastfeed are substantial. This is all without mentioning the fact that attempting to cure a disease is entirely the wrong reason to have a baby (I know a lot of women suffering from endometriosis hear the “just get pregnant” theory a lot too).

The most ridiculous theory of them all, however, is that I am possessed by a demon and need to be exorcised. I doubt this one needs to be explained, and I have nothing more to say about this one other than “what the F is wrong with some people“.

So please, medical research is a serious career path, and these people know what they’re talking about. Listen to them!

Author: diaryofadisabledperson

When I was 14, I suffered viral meningitis, and as a result I contracted a disease called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), which is sometimes called Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E). 6 years on I use a powered wheelchair to get around, and I'm hoping that this blog will give people an insight into life as a disabled person.

One thought on “The Many Theories of M.E.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s