Medal of Honour.

Most people upon first meeting me fall into one of two categories; either I am to be ignored as a blemish upon society’s “flawless” beauty, or I am treated as if the life of a disabled person is so grueling that even existing is something of an achievement. I am not brave because I woke up this morning. I am not brave because I got dressed. I am not brave because I ate breakfast. In fact, I am not brave at all. Anyone who has seen my reaction to any kind of insect or arachnid other than a ladybird or butterfly can confirm this.

One unfortunate truth of living with a currently incurable illness is not knowing if you will ever get better or if you will live the rest of your life experiencing symptoms. Given that Chronic Fatigue Synrdome (CFS) is thankfully not particularly life-threatening and only so in rare and very severe cases, my future in terms of health is a big, blank canvas. I do not know when I will get well, if I recover at all, and I do not know how much life I will have left after recovering, if I have any at all. That would be a daunting prospect to anyone and I would be lying if I said that I did not feel fear of such a future. Frequently I am told that this sort of thinking is pessimistic, but it is not. I’m a realist, and this just is a rather ugly aspect of reality.

Those who have seen me at my very worst, barely able to move in bed and having no interest in food or drink whatsoever, would not say I was brave. They have seen me cry, and they have seen me shake with fear when I realise that this could be my life for a long time. They have seen me withdraw into myself shortly before a medic pokes and prods me and then says that I’m a mere attention-seeker. Everyone else sees me on my better days, when I’m cheerful and upbeat because I’m not in as much pain or as fatigued. They have not seen me cry or shake, and when these people tell me that I’m brave, they have not seen a representative view of every aspect of my life.

No one in their right mind makes the choice to experience chronic, debilitating illnesses. I did not make the choice to face this illness, so why should I be deemed brave for trying to live with a circumstance I can do nothing about? Bravery, for me, is when someone makes the choice to face their fears, or to put themselves in harm’s way to protect others. I have done neither, and so will adamantly deny any bravery on my part.

My wheelchair is not a medal of honour. Neither should it be a setback, or invisibility cloak. It is a wheelchair, and it’s only function is to carry me from place to place because I cannot carry myself.

Author: diaryofadisabledperson

My multi-award-winning blog discusses what life is like as a disabled bisexual woman. I have a 1st class honours degree in nutrition from the University of Leeds where I now work in medical research, something which has been very difficult when I have had a chronic illness for many years. Outside of work I have a passion for wrestling, rock music, and the MCU. You can find me on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram simply by searching diaryofadisabledperson.

4 thoughts on “Medal of Honour.”

  1. I kind of feel that saying how grave someone is is just a form of pity worded falsely. It’s funny how many people seem to delight in showing pity, negativity or the like. If they channelled their energy into positive thoughts and actions just imagine what the world could be.

    Liked by 1 person

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