Make Your Voice Heard!

If ever you needed proof that I care about all disabilities and not just wheelchairs, then here it is:

The company I work for helps to develop and implement digital health technology in the NHS, making healthcare easier to reach and more accessible for everyone. One of our current projects is concerned with the accessibility of GP’s surgeries to those who are hard of hearing, or partially sighted/blind. As part of this project, we will be running a workshop on Monday 14th May in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire (more details below), and I am one of the members of staff who will be present on the day. I can personally assure you that the the entire team is going to great lengths to ensure that everyone’s needs are met.

Our project is 1 of 20 across the country being sponsored by NHS Digital, and is jointly run with the Good Things Foundation. As well as supporting the hard of hearing and partially sighted/blind to have a better GP experience, we also aim to work with GP staff and anyone else who wishes to be a ‘Digital Champion’, sharing our combined knowledge to improve pathways through health services wherever we can.

At the workshop you can explore accessibility technology and have an opportunity to tell us what needs to change to make it easier for you to visit your GP, as well as getting to see the strange, wheelchair-shaped person behind Diary of a Disabled Person in action.

And if that’s not enough to interest you, then this should do the trick: FREE FOOD.

14.05 Workshop Details.

 

The Lovely Blog Award.

The Lovely Blog Award is given by bloggers to other bloggers whose content is well-written and insightful, often inspiring others to put pen to paper (or in my case finger to keyboard) themselves. In order to accept this award the nominee must thank the blogger who nominated them, give seven facts about themselves, and nominate seven other bloggers for the award.

Accepting the Award:

After unexpectedly receiving a nomination for the Leibster Award (see acceptance post here: https://diaryofadisabledperson.blog/2018/01/21/the-leibster-award/), I was perhaps even more surprised to be nominated for the Lovely Blog Award. I would like to thank Chamomile Midnight Rambles for their nomination, and would recommend that you give their blog a visit here: https://chamomilemidnightrambles.wordpress.com/.

Seven Facts About Me:

  1. My favourite style of drumming, despite my tendency to listen to rock and metal music, was actually samba music. Although fast and complex it was also extremely good fun, particularly as the drums take centre stage for this style of music. Image description: teenage me in my school uniform sat behind a blue drum-kit.
  2. I have a (semi-secret) soft spot for music by Rihanna, Lady Gaga, and Katy Perry.
  3. As a teenager I once had black-coloured braces, which actually looked far better than that sounds.
  4. I have never had driving lessons and cannot drive at all.
  5. I currently work in NHS administration, in a small department that works on digital health and technology in healthcare.
  6. Our office has a dog called Bi-Bi!
  7. I am getting married at the end of December 2018.

My Nominees:

The Disability Diaries: https://disabilitydiaries.com/

Seeing M.E in Reality: https://seeingmeinreality.com/

Wheelescapades: https://wheelescapades.com/

KimiBlack: https://kimiblack.wordpress.com/

A Backpack, A Chair, and A Beard: https://waywardwheeler.wordpress.com/

Roxy Moto: https://roxymoto.wordpress.com/

HeyIt’sLeaa: https://heyitsleaa.co.uk/

Announcement.

Dear all,

Those of you who follow me on social media (Facebook: @diaryofadisabledperson, Twitter: @WheelsofSteer), or who know me in person, will know that this week I was offered more hours at work. With the current dismal financial state of affairs, and a forecast even worse, the increased wage was too good to turn down, and so I quickly accepted. The only downside of the additional hours, and one that I can no longer ignore, is that I can expect a decline in my health.

The decrease in the time I can spend on my writing, and the increased need to rest and recouporate will naturally impact my ability to run Diary of a Disabled Person. The undeniable truth of the matter is that writing, editing, recording, illustrating, and publishing my content, alongside managing two social media accounts, takes a lot of time and energy. This is time and energy I will no longer have.

Therefore I have come to the decision to end this blog. The content will remain available, and I will maintain my social media accounts and continue advocating for disabled rights, but new content will no longer be published.

I am terribly sorry to have to end this so suddenly, and I want to thank you all for your continued support.

It is with regret, then, that I write these final words for you to read.

Wishing you all the best,

Emma Steer.

Stephen Hawking: A Brief Moment in Time.

In 1963 doctors gave Stephen Hawking two years to live. Little did they know that he would defy all odds, surviving for fifty-five years instead. Most people would have been content to be the medical miracle that proved the doctors wrong, but Stephen Hawking was not most people. He decided to use his time, however long or short, wisely.

Professor Hawking was a brilliant scientist, building on the work of Albert Einstein to send cosmological research in entirely new directions. He re-shaped the way we think about our very own universe, an exceptional feat. Alongside this he also helped to make the incredibly complex research accessible to the general public by making public appearances to give lectures, help produce documentaries, and wrote the book “A Brief History of Time” which does an excellent job of laying out what his research was about and what it all means. Later in his career he also co-authored a series of children’s books where all the events in the stories were theoretically possible, helping to spark interest in the minds of the next generation of scientists. While not a physicist myself, I still feel that his contributions to the scientific community are immense and unforgettable.

For any human to achieve academically what Professor Hawking did would be worthy of celebration, but to do this in the face of an incurable and devastating illness that gradually stripped away his ability to communicate his ideas to others is equally as mind-blowing as any of his research. In doing so he helped prove to the entirety of Western civilisation that disability does not mean that someone is unable to make valuable contributions to society. He helped to normalise disability in the eyes of the public and to raise awareness for the equal treatment of the disabled. By making frequent cameo appearances in TV shows and adverts, often blatantly making fun of his own predicament, he made the rest of the world comfortable with the notion of disability. He humanised us all.

Usually the death of a celebrity might warrant a tweet or a short Facebook post, but Stephen Hawking deserves a whole lot more. As both a scientist and someone disabled, I want to recognise him as nothing short of an icon who changed the world. May he rest in peace.

Image description: a colour photograph of Stephen Hawking.

Donations.

Due to some technical issues the donations tab that I set up a few weeks ago has not been working. The issue is now resolved (and has been tested by my wonderful fiance).

To donate, click the donate button in the top, right hand corner of the screen (or click the menu button, and then bottom button is donate on phones and tablets), and select your preferred method of payment.

Donations are not obligatory, but any support is very much appreciated.