One Good Turn.

It was a dismal day in late October, and the drizzle had soaked me from head to foot as I travelled into town. The light was fading quickly, and the temperature falling even faster. There was little doubt in my mind that the first of the winter’s frosts would develop overnight.

I turned left onto a bridge crossing a main road. People were passing across the bridge in droves, it being one of the busiest routes in and out of town for pedestrians. To one side, huddled beneath the railing, was a homeless man. His thin and worn blanket gave little protection against the cold, and every possession he had was dripping with rain water.

Nearly everyone on that bridge saw the homeless man, and nearly everyone carried on walking anyway. I’m sure they had their reasons. However, for whatever reason, I just couldn’t go past him and leave with a clear conscience.

I had a flapjack in my handbag, which I’d been planning to eat upon returning home. I reached into my bag and handed it to him without making a fuss. It wasn’t a big deal; he had far more need of it than I did. He looked up and thanked me with such genuine compassion it took me by surprise. We exchanged a few short sentences, and then I set off again, thinking nothing more of the matter.

A couple of months later, I was at a Christmas event serving free mulled wine and mince pies, which was inevitably crowded. Among those in attendance were several homeless people, who the staff welcomed along with everyone else.

I was struggling to navigate through the crowd, most of whom completely ignored me if they were even aware of my presence at all. I came to a heavy door, which I struggled to hold open as I tried to pass my wheelchair through the narrow gap without hitting anyone. Clearly someone had noticed my predicament, because I felt the weight of the door taken off my wrist. I looked up to thank the person holding the door open for me, and to my surprise and genuine delight, I recognised the homeless man I had helped before. He simply said “one good turn deserves another”, and then he was swallowed up by the crowd.

A couple of years later I was sat in a bar with a good friend, when the same homeless man walked past us and nodded at me. Naturally, this led to me explaining what had happened. When I’d finished speaking, my friend laughed and called me “the Good Bradfordian”, à la the biblical parable.

***

When I was a child attending Sunday school, the parable of the Good Samaritan had always confused me. It seemed to me to support basic racism, because we are repeatedly told that certain passers-by were expected to help, and that the Samaritan wasn’t, simply because of where he was from. I didn’t understand why being Samaritan excluded you from the expectation to help, nor why being from elsewhere guaranteed your help.

Similarly, the story also suggested that it was a good idea to help people because you would be rewarded, and the richer the rescued person was, the greater the reward. I failed to grasp why a motivation to do the right thing would be needed, instead believing doing the right thing to be the reward itself.

I expected no reward for being the one who did the right thing. Why should I? Just because I’m from a stereotypically rough city doesn’t mean I can’t help others, and have no compassion for them, and neither does being disabled. I am almost certain the homeless man expected no reward for holding the door open for me, and probably failed to understand why others wouldn’t help me either. I would hope we would be in mutual agreement upon this matter; it is simply a shame he may never get to read this.

Author: diaryofadisabledperson

When I was 14, I suffered viral meningitis, and as a result I contracted a disease called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), which is sometimes called Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E). 6 years on I use a powered wheelchair to get around, and I'm hoping that this blog will give people an insight into life as a disabled person.

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